STAT Communications Ag Market News

Third Smaller Bean Harvest

WASHINGTON - Jan 12/22 - SNS --Dry edible bean production in those states included in the USDA report ended up at 22.7 million cwt (100 pounds) or 1.03 million metric tons (MT), down 30% from 2020, according to the final crop report for 2021.

Planted area was estimated at 1.39 million acres, down 19% from 2020. Harvested area was estimated at 1.34 million acres, down 20% from the previous year.

The average United States yield for dry edible beans for the 2021 season is 1,701 pounds per acre, down 261 pounds from 2020.

In North Dakota, drought conditions reducing yield and caused some dry beans to crack. There were reports that some farmers used those beans as livestock feed. Further, the bean quality in some areas was good, but due to the drought the size of the beans were smaller.

For Michigan, the 2021 growing season was very good for the largest classes of dry beans (navy and black). These classes are mostly grown in Michigan's "Thumb" and yields were the highest ever reported.

Dry Edible Bean Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production - States and
United States: 2019-2021
[Excludes chickpeas]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 :          Area planted          :          Area harvested
      State      :--------------------------------------------------------------------
                 :   2019   :   2020   :   2021   :   2019    :   2020    :   2021
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 :                            1,000 acres
                 :
California ......:    27.9       25.0       16.0        27.9        25.0        15.4
Colorado ........:    37.0       57.0       33.0        33.2        52.0        32.0
Idaho ...........:    47.0       68.0       58.0        45.0        66.0        57.0
Michigan ........:   185.0      255.0      210.0       180.0       253.0       208.0
Minnesota .......:   210.3      275.0      240.0       196.7       263.0       234.0
Nebraska ........:   120.1      165.0      120.0        96.8       159.0       114.0
North Dakota ....:   616.5      815.0      660.0       551.5       785.0       620.0
Washington ......:    26.0       39.0       40.0        25.9        38.0        39.5
Wyoming .........:    21.0       28.0       17.0        17.3        23.5        15.7
                 :
United States ...: 1,290.8    1,727.0    1,394.0     1,174.3     1,664.5     1,335.6
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 :       Yield per acre 1/        :           Production 1/
      State      :--------------------------------------------------------------------
                 :   2019   :   2020   :   2021   :   2019    :   2020    :   2021
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 :   ---------- pounds ---------      ---------- 1,000 cwt ---------
                 :
California ......:   2,610      2,390      2,450         729         598         377
Colorado ........:   1,840      2,070      1,880         610       1,074         602
Idaho ...........:   2,370      2,410      2,610       1,067       1,592       1,486
Michigan ........:   2,040      2,340      2,410       3,663       5,914       5,011
Minnesota .......:   2,040      2,100      1,960       4,017       5,523       4,596
Nebraska ........:   1,940      2,260      2,440       1,879       3,597       2,780
North Dakota ....:   1,400      1,630      1,030       7,713      12,794       6,397
Washington ......:   2,660      2,800      2,770         688       1,064       1,094
Wyoming .........:   2,250      2,170      2,410         390         509         378
                 :
United States ...:   1,768      1,962      1,701      20,756      32,665      22,721
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1/ Clean basis.

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